The hard work of playing, as a team

Being Aubrey at work, and the Atlassians who made that OK

A picture soothes a thousand fears

On the Monday after the shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, I was absolutely not OK. The largest mass shooting in U.S. history was committed against a queer safe space, and almost all of the victims were people of color. People who could have been me. I’ve never been quite so scared of leaving my house. The fear I was holding in the pit of my stomach felt like it was infecting my bones. In that moment and the days that followed, I felt heavy and distracted. I fought back the tears threatening to spill out of my eyelids and let everyone see just how human I am.

Just checking in

If you know me well (or follow me on Medium), you might know that I had a particularly difficult time during Brock Turner’s trial. That particular story hit frighteningly close to home, and living in the era of social media isn’t great when you’re trying to avoid news like that. Because I’m pretty open and proactive, I had a very frank conversation with my manager about the fact that it was a hard week, and the reason why. I didn’t ask for different treatment, or miss any deadlines. I just put it out there that I was a bit raw. After the outrage over the sentencing died down, things went back to normal. But three months later, I woke up to the news that he was out of prison after serving only 3 months in jail.

My ask of each of you

It’s not a controversial statement to say that there is a lot of pain in the world today. In just the past few months, we’ve seen an absolute horror show of news. From the Pulse shooting to terror attacks in every corner of the globe, to the ongoing brutality by American police forces that is disproportionately borne by communities of color. We see the Kickstarters, the acts of solidarity, and the hashtags on Twitter. But we cannot and should not forget that while these incidents may seem far away, for those of us close to these issues or who are members of these communities, they are very real. They affect us where we live, sleep, and work. Research is emerging showing that repeated viewing of violent images against people we identify with can create PTSD-like mental health symptoms.

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Equitable Design & Impact @CultureAmp. Advisor, investor. Mathpath = (Math Nerd + Empath). Queer dog mom, Latina. Your contribution matters. She/her.

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Aubrey Blanche, The Mathpath

Aubrey Blanche, The Mathpath

Equitable Design & Impact @CultureAmp. Advisor, investor. Mathpath = (Math Nerd + Empath). Queer dog mom, Latina. Your contribution matters. She/her.