These are really great questions that I’m happy to answer. I chose to limit it to tech specifically (and those working inside tech companies) for a few reasons.

First, I wanted to look at people who are primarily employed at for-profit organizations, because given that financial structure, I’d expect more and higher compensation for labor performed.

Second, I wanted to bracket it to the tech industry specifically because there is a long history of D&I existing in other industries, but the latest “wave” of Tech D&I is pretty fundamentally different. Companies are hiring in specialists significantly earlier in their company lifecycles (many before they go public and are <1000 people), and so I wanted to answer a specific question about that. On a more boring/methodological note, I didn’t know how many responses I would get, and was concerned that adding industry heterogeneity to the data would make it harder to understand tech industry patterns. :)

But really, thank you for writing! It’s always nice to hear from other people working on these challenges as well!

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Equitable Design & Impact @CultureAmp. Advisor, investor. Mathpath = (Math Nerd + Empath). Queer dog mom, Latina. Your contribution matters. She/her.

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Aubrey Blanche, The Mathpath

Aubrey Blanche, The Mathpath

Equitable Design & Impact @CultureAmp. Advisor, investor. Mathpath = (Math Nerd + Empath). Queer dog mom, Latina. Your contribution matters. She/her.